News

Handley Page Halifax Mk VIII (HP 70)

Handley Page Halifax Mk VIII (HP 70)


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Handley Page Halifax Mk VIII (HP 70)

C Mk VIII (HP 70)

The C Mk VIII was a dedicated cargo carrying version of the Halifax. It used the Hercules 100 engine, and could carry ten stretchers or eleven passengers. The bomb bay doors were replaced by a cargo pannier, which could carry up to 8,000 lbs of freight (the point of the pannier being to create extra space in the fuselage). The Mk VIII appeared very late in the war, first flying in June 1945. The RAF retained the C Mk VIII until 1948.

C Mk VIII Halton

A number of C Mk VIII Halifaxes entered civilian service. Twelve were employed by BOAC as cargo aircraft, as Handley Page HP 70 Haltons. The Halton had a short civilian career, starting late in 1946 and ending in May 1948.

Forty-one privately owned Halifax cargo planes were used in the Berlin airlift, carrying 54,000 tons of supplies to the city they had so often visited before.


Air Catalogue
100,640 line items.
23,673 on-line scans.
Updated 17 June 2021.

Road & General Catalogue
126,407 line items.
50,524 on-line scans.
Updated 17 June 2021.

Rail Catalogue
5,094 line items.
946 on-line scans.
Updated 15 June 2021.

Horse Drawn Catalogue
345 line items.
126 on-line scans.
Updated 27 October 2020.

Maritime Catalogue
1,612 line items.
372 on-line scans.
Updated 15 June 2021.


Handley Page Halifax bomber enters American WWII statistical history

16th July 2014 (updated 7th August 2015) | Nanton, Alberta, Canada. Aviation historians are aware of the thousands of Americans who perished in the air wars against Axis militaries. However, only recently has it come to light that, in terms of numbers of American airmen killed in heavy bomber types, the British-built Handley Page Halifax was the bomber with the 4th highest casualty toll.

Karl Kjarsgaard, Director of Bomber Command Museum of Canada and Halifax 57 Rescue (Canada), conducted the substantiating research and announced his findings to 20th Century Aviation Magazine. Mr. Kjarsgaard discovered the following facts: “Of the heavy bombers flown by Americans in combat during World War II the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, Consolidated B-24 Liberator, and the Boeing B-29 Super Fortress had the highest casualty rates for aircrew.

A Halifax Mk. III.
Photo: Royal Air Force.

However, Mr. Kjarsgaard stated unequivocally that historians “can now add the Handley Page Halifax as the next most important heavy bomber in American aviation history in terms of sacrifice.” He added, “I have the data to prove it.” Karl Kjarsgaard then said, “The main point to note is that the majority of these ‘RCAF Americans KIA’ were crewing a Halifax in combat as opposed to other bombers and fighters. Some 70% of all bomber combat between 1942 and 1945 in the RCAF was on the Halifax.” He noted that “Canadians did not fly the more famous Avro Lancaster until the last 3 months of the war.”

An early mark of Halifax with Merlin engines.
Photo: Royal Air Force.

From 1940 to 1942, when the United States was still officially, if not actually, maintaining a neutral stance, many Americans volunteered for service with the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). The United States’ and Canada’s Mother Country (England) essentially stood alone as air, land and naval forces of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy attacked the homeland and other countries. Democracy was in peril, and the situation was unacceptable to a sizable number of Americans. As far away as the Deep South, patriots did not cotton to the idea of National Socialism swallowing and enslaving Europe. Young men made their way up to Canada and volunteered, at the risk of losing their citizenship, to defend the United Kingdom and the British Commonwealth through service in the RCAF. Americans were naturally called upon to replace the heavy personnel losses in Bomber Command, and, as Mr. Kjarsgaard’s numbers indicate, they paid a high price. “We now have good information that the total KIA of RCAF Americans is well over 830 airmen,” offered Mr. Kjarsgaard.

/> An artist’s rendering of LW170’s profile.
Image: Bomber Command Museum of Canada

Halifax 57 Rescue (Canada) regularly spreads the word about the significant role played by the largely overshadowed aeroplanes. One goal is to eventually raise RCAF Halifax LW170 which flew 29 missions in 1944 — including sorties on D-Day. On 24 June 1944 the Halifax encountered mechanical problems and went down into the Irish Sea while being piloted by Flight Lieutenant Mel Compton of Richmond, Virginia. “LW170 is the only Halifax bomber of 1,230 used by the RCAF in WW2 to have survived the war, all the rest were left behind and cut up in England,” stated Mr. Kjarsgaard. He continued, “LW170 ditched off the coast of Ireland during a weather patrol after the war. We know where she sank in 6,000 feet of deep water within 2 miles. Now we must locate ‘her’ and do a recovery.” Karl noted that, “I secured a sonar company in Ireland that is willing and able to conduct a sonar survey next summer, but funding is a major factor.”

A Halifax Mk. VIII.
Photo: Royal Air Force.

Karl Kjarsgaard added that, “On the front burner is the proposed recovery of RAF Halifax HR980 from the swamp north of Berlin in October. I will be going to the swamp in early August to do more study related to this Halifax recovery.” Karl stressed that, “Halifax 57 Rescue (Canada)’s priority is to remove the 5 entombed airmen still entombed inside the fuselage and see to their burials with full honours, and I am currently corresponding with the men’s families with that aim.” Mr. Kjarsgaard concluded with a final statement: “This endeavour is slated for early October 2014 — if we can secure the funding.” He therefore hopes the public is therefore urged to contribute.

The author (Colonel John Stemple) thanks Mr. Karl Kjarsgaard for granting an interview. Those individuals desiring more information on Halifax Rescue 57 (Canada) or wishing to support the recovery initiatives should contact the organisation at (403) 603 – 8592. You may contact Col. Stemple via the following e-mail address: [email protected]

Halifax at War: The Story of a Bomber. DVD. ISBN 978-1-55259-974-7. Nightfighter Productions Inc., 2005.


ハンドレページ ハリファックス

ハンドレページ社は、空軍省の出した仕様 P.13/36 に合致するバルチャーエンジン2基を搭載した H.P.56 を開発した。しかし本機は開発中のエンジンであるバルチャーエンジンを用いたため性能不足であった。そこで1,280馬力のロールス・ロイス製マーリンエンジン4基に増強した H.P.57 が設計された。イギリス空軍は、最初の試作機が飛行する以前に100機を発注した。重爆撃機の名称に慣例となっている町の名前として、ウェスト・ヨークシャーからハリファックスと名づけられ、Mk I(マークワン)が1939年9月24日にバイチェスター空軍基地で初飛行した。

ハリファックス Mk Iは両翼に6つの爆弾を搭載できる他、6.7 m(22フィート)の爆弾倉を持つ。爆弾の搭載量は、5,897 kg(13,000 lb)に上った。マーリンエンジンは、木製の恒速プロペラを駆動した。

ハリファックスの防御火器は機首に7.7 mm ブローニングM1919重機関銃を2門、尾部に4門を装備した。機首と尾部の機関銃は、ボールトンポール製砲塔に搭載された。ビームアタックに備え、真横を射線に捉えた左右各1門のヴィッカース K 機関銃を胴体中央の側面に搭載するハリファックスもあった。

わずかな改良によって、Mk Iは細分化された。最初のMk Iは、Mk I シリーズ Iと称された。続くシリーズ IIでは総重量が26,310 kg(58,000ポンド)から27,220 kg(60,000ポンド)に増えた。シリーズ IIIでは、より大型なラジエーターを搭載し、燃料搭載量を増強した。これらのMk Iには、同じ主翼のエンジン2基が停止する事態になるか、急な機動を行うと機体が錐揉み状態に陥るという欠陥があり、それが尾翼の設計に起因していたことが判明した [1] 。

1,390馬力(1,040 kW)のマーリン XX エンジンを導入し、胴体中央の機関銃に代わって二連装の7.7 mm 胴体背部砲塔を搭載したハリファックスは、B Mk II シリーズ Iと称された。Mk II シリーズ I (スペシャル) では、機首と背部の砲塔を撤去することで性能を向上させた。Mk II シリーズ IAは、大きな垂直尾翼とパースペックス・ノーズに変更され、エンジンはマーリン 22 エンジンに換装された。また、背部にはデファイアントタイプの4連装砲塔が搭載された。尾翼の設計変更で初期型の方向舵のオーバーバランスがもたらす失速による操縦性不良を解決し、パースペックス・ノーズは後のハリファックスで典型的な機首形状となった。

メシエ製ランディング・ギアの不足のため、ダウティ製ランディング・ギアが使われた。メシエ製ギアと互換性がなく、ダウティ製ギアを装備したハリファックス MK IIは新しい呼称を与えられ、Mk Vと称された。ダウティ製ギアの使用は、Mk IIよりも生産の効率向上に繋がったが、着陸重量が18,000 kg(40,000ポンド)に減少したため、通常は沿岸軍団や訓練部隊にまわされた。Mk Vは、ルーツのスピーク工場とフェアリーのストックポート工場で生産され、Mk IIの総生産数1,966機と比較して、1944年から始まったMk Vの生産数は904機となった [1] 。

最多の2,091機が生産されたハリファックスの派生型は、1943年に登場したB Mk IIIであった。尾翼やパースペックス・ノーズなどは、Mk II シリーズ IAと同様だったが、最も大きな変更は、マーリンより強力な1,650馬力(1,230 kW)のブリストル ハーキュリーズ XVI エンジンを搭載したことである。その他には、デ・ハビランド製の油圧可変プロペラの採用、丸味を帯びた翼端への変更であった。Mk IVの設計は、ハーキュリーズに排気タービン過給器を組み合わせたものだったが、生産されることはなかった。

決定的なバージョンであるB Mk VIは、強力な1,800馬力(1,300 kW)のハーキュリーズ 100 エンジンを搭載し、最終的な爆撃型であるMk VIIでは、ハーキュリーズ XVIに戻された。これらの派生型は、いずれも少数しか生産されなかった。

防御火器を装備しないC Mk VIIIは、爆弾倉のスペースに貨物を搭載し、乗客11名を空輸できる輸送機型であった。全てのスペースを落下傘部隊の搭載に振り向けたMk A IXでは、最大16名の武装兵と各種装置を搭載できた。輸送・貨物型のハリファックスは、ハンドレページ ハルトンと称された。民間向けのハリファックスやハルトンは、爆撃機や輸送機の運用国以外でもスイス、ノルウェー、イギリス領インド、南アフリカ共和国などの航空会社で採用された。


Handley Page Halifax Mk VIII (HP 70) - History



























Handley Page H.P.67 &ldquoHastings&rdquo
RAF four-engine troop-carrier and freight transport

Archive Photos 1

Handley Page H.P.67 &ldquoHastings C.1A&rdquo (TG528) on display (c.1994) at the Imperial War Museum Duxford, Cambridgeshire, England

Overview 2

  • Handley Page &ldquoHastings&rdquo
  • Role: Transport aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Handley Page
  • First flight: 7 May 1946
  • Introduction: September 1948
  • Retired: 1977 (RAF)
  • Primary users: RAF RNZAF
  • Produced: 1947 - 1952
  • Number built: 151
  • Variants: Handley Page Hermes

The Handley Page H.P.67 &ldquoHastings&rdquo was a British troop-carrier and freight transport aircraft designed and built by Handley Page Aircraft Company for the Royal Air Force. At the time, it was the largest transport plane ever designed for the RAF, and it replaced the Avro &ldquoYork&rdquo as the standard long-range transport.

Design and Development 2

Handley Page&rsquos answer to meet Air Staff Specification C.3/44 for a long-range general purpose transport was the HP.67. It was an all-metal low-wing cantilever monoplane with conventional tail unit. It had all-metal tapering dihedral wings, which had been designed for the abandoned HP.66 bomber development of the Handley Page &ldquoHalifax&rdquo and a circular fuselage suitable for pressurization up to 5.5 psi (38 kPa). It had a retractable undercarriage and tailwheel. The &ldquoHastings&rdquo was powered by four wing-mounted Bristol &ldquoHercules&rdquo 101 sleeve valve radial engines. In service the aircraft was operated by a crew of five and could accommodate either 30 paratroopers, 32 stretchers and 28 sitting casualties, or 50 fully equipped troops.

A civilian version of the &ldquoHastings&rdquo was developed as the Handley Page &ldquoHermes&rdquo. The &ldquoHermes&rdquo prototypes were given priority over the &ldquoHastings&rdquo but the program was put on hold after the prototype crashed on its first flight on 2 December 1945 and the company concentrated on the military &ldquoHastings&rdquo variant. The first of two &ldquoHastings&rdquo prototype (TE580) flew at RAF Wittering on 7 May 1946. Tests showed that the aircraft was laterally unstable and that it had poor stall warning capabilities. The prototypes and first few production aircraft were subject to a series of urgent modifications and testing to resolve these problems. A temporary solution was found by modifying the tailplane with 15° of dihedral, while being fitted with synthetic stall warning. This allowed the first production aircraft (&ldquoHastings C.1&rdquo) to enter service in October 1948.

The RAF initially ordered 100 &ldquoHastings C.1&rdquo aircraft but the last six were built as weather reconnaissance versions as the &ldquoHastings Met. Mk.1&rdquo, and seven other aircraft were converted to this standard. Eight C.1 aircraft were later converted to &ldquoHastings T.5&rdquo trainers which were used for training the V-bomber crews three at a time.

While tail modifications introduced to the C.1 allowed it to enter service, a more definitive solution was the fitting of an extended-span tailplane, which was mounted lower on the fuselage. These changes, together with the fitting of additional fuel tanks in the outer wing, resulted in the C.Mk.2, while a further modified VIP transport, fitted with yet more fuel to give a longer range became the C.Mk.4.

A total of 147 aircraft were built for the Royal Air Force and four for the Royal New Zealand Air Force, a total of 151.

Operational History 2

The &ldquoHastings&rdquo was rushed into service because of the Berlin Airlift, with No. 47 Squadron replacing its &ldquoHalifax A.Mk.9&rsquos&rdquo with &ldquoHastings&rdquo in September-October 1948, flying its first sortie to Berlin on 11 November 1948. The &ldquoHastings&rdquo fleet was mainly used to carry coal, with two further squadrons, 297 and 53 joining the airlift before its end. A &ldquoHastings&rdquo made the last sortie of the airlift on 6 October 1949, the 32 &ldquoHastings&rdquo deployed delivering 55,000 tons (49,900 tonnes) of supplies for the loss of two aircraft.

One hundred &ldquoHastings C.Mk.1&rdquo and 41 &ldquoHastings C.Mk.2&rdquo were built, and they served both on Transport CommanD&rsquos long-range routes and as a tactical transport until well after the arrival of the Bristol &ldquoBritannia&rdquo in 1959. An example of the latter use was during the Suez Crisis when &ldquoHastings&rdquo of 70, 99 and 511 Squadrons dropped paratroopers on El Gamil airfield.

&ldquoHastings&rdquo continued to provide transport support to British military operations around the globe through the 1950s and 1960s, including dropping supplies to troops opposing Indonesian forces in Malaysia during the Indonesian Confrontation.

The &ldquoHastings&rdquo was retired from Royal Air Force Transport Command in early 1968 when it was replaced by the Lockheed &ldquoHercules&rdquo. The Met Mk.1 weather reconnaissance aircraft were used by No. 202 Squadron RAF at RAF Aldergrove, Northern Ireland from 1950 until the Squadron was disbanded on 31 July 1964, being made obsolete by weather satellites. The &ldquoHastings T.Mk.5&rdquo remained in service as radar trainers well into the 1970s, even being used for reconnaissance purposes during the Cold War in the winter of 1975-76, finally being retired on 30 June 1977.

&ldquoHastings&rdquo were also operated in New Zealand, where the Royal New Zealand Air Force&rsquos 40 Squadron flew the type until replaced by C-130 &ldquoHercules&rdquo in 1965. Four &ldquoHastings C.Mk.3&rdquo transport aircraft were built and supplied to the RNZAF. One crashed at RAAF Base Darwin and caused considerable damage to the city&rsquos water main, its railway and the road into the city. The other three were broken up at RNZAF Base Ohakea. During the period that the engines were having problems with their sleeve valves (lubricating oil difficulties) RNZAF personnel joked that the &ldquoHastings&rdquo was the best three-engined aircraft in the world.

Variants 2

  • HP.67 &ldquoHastings&rdquo: Prototype, two built.
  • HP.67 &ldquoHastings C.1&rdquo: Production aircraft with four Bristol Hercules 101 engines, 94 built all later converted to C.1A and T.5.
  • HP. 67 &ldquoHastings C.1A&rdquo: C.1 rebuilt to C.2 standard.
  • HP.67 &ldquoHastings Met.1&rdquo: Weather reconnaissance version for Coastal Command, six built.
  • HP.67 &ldquoHastings C.2&rdquo: Improved version with larger-area tailplane mounted lower on fuselage, increased fuel capacity and powered by Bristol Hercules 106 engines, 43 built and C.1&rsquos were modified to this standard as C.1A&rsquos.
  • HP.95 &ldquoHastings C.3&rdquo: Transport aircraft for the RNZAF, similar to C.2 but had Bristol &ldquoHercules&rdquo 737 engines, four built.
  • HP.94 &ldquoHastings C.4&rdquo: VIP transport version for four VIP&rsquos and staff, four built.
  • HP.67 &ldquoHastings T.5&rdquo: Eight C.1&rsquos converted for RAF Bomber Command with ventral radome to train V bomber crews on the Navigation Bombing System (NBS).

Operators 2

  • New Zealand: Royal New Zealand Air Force, No. 40 and 41 Squadrons RNZAF
  • United Kingdom: Royal Air Force. No. 24, 36, 47, 48, 51, 53, 59, 70, 97, 99, 114, 115, 116, 151, 202, 242, 297, and 511 Squadron RAF Far East Communications Squadron RAF

Survivors 2

Four &ldquoHastings&rdquo are preserved in the UK and Germany:

  • TG503 (T.5) on display at the Alliiertenmuseum (Allied Museum), Berlin, Germany.
  • TG511 (T.5) on display at the RAF Museum Cosford, England.
  • TG517 (T.5) on display at the Newark Air Museum, Newark, England.
  • TG528 (C.1A) on display at the Imperial War Museum, Duxford, England.
  • NZ5801 (C.3) 1952. Nose/Cockpit section only of RNZAF Military Transport is preserved at Auckland New ZealanD&rsquos Museum of Transport and Technology along with engines, props and an undercarriage assembly, which is functional for display purposes.

Accidents and Incidents 2

  • 16 July 1949 - &ldquoHastings&rdquo TG611 lost control during takeoff at Berlin-Tegel Airport and dived into the ground due to incorrect tail trim all five crew died.
  • 26 September - 1949 &ldquoHastings&rdquo TG499 lost the belly pannier, which hit the tail causing the aircraft to crash all three crew died.
  • 20 December 1950 - &ldquoHastings&rdquo TG574 lost a propeller in flight, which hit the fuselage killing the co-pilot. The aircraft diverted to Benina, Libya and the aircraft flipped onto its back during landing. A total of five out of the seven crew were killed but the 27 passengers (all "slip" crews returning) survived.
  • 19 March 1951 - &ldquoHastings&rdquo WD478 stalled on takeoff at RAF Strubby 3 crew died.
  • 16 September 1952 - &ldquoHastings&rdquo WD492 had a whiteout and crashed at Northice, Greenland. All the crew rescued by USAF Rescue at Thule.
  • 12 January 1953 - &ldquoHastings C.1&rdquo TG602 crashed after takeoff when both elevator and the tailplane broke away all 5 crew and 4 passengers died.
  • 22 June 1953 - &ldquoHastings&rdquo WJ335 stalled and crashed on takeoff at RAF Abingdon. The elevator control locks had been left engaged. All six crew died.
  • 23 July 1953 - &ldquoHastings&rdquo TG564 crashed on landing at Kai Tak with one fatality on the ground and the aircraft completely burnt out. Flight was outward bound for a casualty evacuation operation from Korea to the United Kingdom.


Air Catalogue
100,640 line items.
23,673 on-line scans.
Updated 17 June 2021.

Road & General Catalogue
126,407 line items.
50,524 on-line scans.
Updated 17 June 2021.

Rail Catalogue
5,094 line items.
946 on-line scans.
Updated 15 June 2021.

Horse Drawn Catalogue
345 line items.
126 on-line scans.
Updated 27 October 2020.

Maritime Catalogue
1,612 line items.
372 on-line scans.
Updated 15 June 2021.


Air Catalogue
100,640 line items.
23,673 on-line scans.
Updated 17 June 2021.

Road & General Catalogue
126,407 line items.
50,524 on-line scans.
Updated 17 June 2021.

Rail Catalogue
5,094 line items.
946 on-line scans.
Updated 15 June 2021.

Horse Drawn Catalogue
345 line items.
126 on-line scans.
Updated 27 October 2020.

Maritime Catalogue
1,612 line items.
372 on-line scans.
Updated 15 June 2021.


Spis treści

Samolot został skonstruowany na podstawie specyfikacji nr P.13/36 wydanej przez brytyjskie Ministerstwo Lotnictwa (Air Ministry) 8 września 1936 roku na bombowiec dalekiego zasięgu nowej generacji, dla zastąpienia starych samolotów dwupłatowych [1] . Pierwotnie miał to być dwusilnikowy czteromiejscowy średni bombowiec, o udźwigu 8000 funtów bomb (3629 kg), zasięgu w zależności od ładunku 2000–3000 mil (3218–4827 km) i prędkości przelotowej 275 mil/h (442 km/h) [a] . W konkursie uczestniczyło osiem wytwórni i zwyciężył projekt Avro Type 679 (Manchester), lecz 30 kwietnia 1937 zamówiono także budowę dwóch prototypów samolotu Handley Page HP.56, ocenionego na drugim miejscu [1] . Projektantem samolotu był główny konstruktor zakładów Handley Page George Volkert [2] . Podobnie jak Manchester, projekt HP.56 miał był napędzany dwoma nowymi silnikami Rolls-Royce Vulture o dużej mocy, jednak okazały się one niedopracowane i w lipcu 1937 Sztab Lotniczy zdecydował o zastosowaniu czterech silników o mniejszej mocy [1] . Samolot jeszcze przed zbudowaniem musiał zostać zasadniczo przeprojektowany, otrzymując nowe oznaczenie fabryczne HP.57 przy tym został powiększony – rozpiętość zwiększyła się z 26,8 do 30,2 m, a masa wzrosła o prawie 6 ton (z 17 690 kg do 23 597 kg) [2] . Projekt i makieta zostały zaakceptowane i rozpoczęto budowę prototypu, która borykała się z opóźnieniami w dostawie silników [2] . Pierwszy prototyp HP.57 (numer L7244) oblatano 25 października 1939 roku w bazie RAF Bicester [2] . Napędzany był czterema silnikami rzędowymi sprawdzonej rodziny Rolls-Royce Merlin X o mocy 1280 KM. Zmiana ta faktycznie przeniosła bombowiec do kategorii ciężkich, a moc silników okazała się wystarczająca do startu samolotu z maksymalną masą [2] .

Samolot jeszcze przed zbudowaniem pierwszego prototypu został zamówiony 7 stycznia 1938 przez brytyjskie lotnictwo w liczbie 100 sztuk, po czym otrzymał nazwę Halifax, od miasta w Anglii [3] . Przewidywano, że dostawy rozpoczną się wiosną 1940 roku [3] . Drugi prototyp L7245, z uzbrojeniem i pełnym wyposażeniem, oblatano 17 sierpnia 1940 roku, z opóźnieniem spowodowanym m.in. oczekiwaniem na dostawę wieżyczek produkcji Boulton Paul oraz koniecznymi poprawkami aerodynamicznymi [4] . Pierwszy samolot seryjny natomiast oblatano 11 października tego samego roku [4] . Produkcja opóźniła się i początkowo była niska z powodu decyzji brytyjskiego lotnictwa o priorytecie dla już wytwarzanych typów (w przypadku Handley Page był to Hampden) oraz z powodu dopracowywania konstrukcji w toku produkcji [3] . Od listopada samoloty seryjne wchodził do służby.

Halifax był budowany w szeregu kolejnych wersji, zachowujących tę samą konstrukcję, lecz różniących się detalami. Wersje bombowe wyróżniane były literą „B” (bomber), wersje desantowe literą „A” (airborne), wersje patrolowe literami „GR” (ground reconnaissance), a transportowe literą „C” (cargo), przy czym litery te bywają pomijane w oznaczeniach, zwłaszcza podstawowej wersji bombowej. Numer modelu poprzedzały litery „Mk.” (Mark) – model, które jednakże często są w zapisie pomijane.

Pierwszą wersją seryjną był bombowiec Halifax B Mk.I, zbliżony do prototypów, z silnikami Merlin X o mocy 1280 KM [3] . Wersja ta wyróżniała się nosem kadłuba z przeszkloną „brodą” stanowiącą stanowisko bombardiera i z umieszczoną nad nią wieżyczką Boulton Paul Type C z dwoma karabinami maszynowymi (w układzie podobnym do zastosowanego później w Lancasterze). Dalsze uzbrojenie obronne stanowiła wieżyczka Boulton Paul Type E na końcu kadłuba, z czterema karabinami maszynowymi i dwa karabiny maszynowe w bocznych oknach. Wyróżnia się ponadto poszczególne serie tej wersji: 25 samolotów Mk.I serii II miało w stosunku do pierwszej serii zwiększoną masę maksymalną (z 24.970 kg do 27.240 kg), a dziewięć samolotów Mk.I serii III zwiększone zbiorniki paliwa. Zbudowano 84 samoloty wersji Mk.I [4] .

Wersja Mk.II, nosząca oznaczenie fabryczne HP.59, otrzymała nowe silniki rzędowe Merlin XX o mocy 1390 KM. Pierwsze samoloty tej wersji wyprodukowano we wrześniu 1941. W pierwszej serii, B Mk.II Series I, ulepszono uzbrojenie przez dodanie wieżyczki grzbietowej z dwoma karabinami maszynowymi zamiast karabinów maszynowych w bocznych oknach. W serii Mk.II Series I (Special) w celu zwiększenia osiągów przez zmniejszenie oporu zmieniono nos kadłuba, zastępując przednią wieżyczkę przez obły nieoszklony nos, posiadający jedynie małe okienka. Usunięto też wysoką wieżyczkę grzbietową. Istotne zmiany wprowadziła seria Mk.II Series IA, przede wszystkim nowy kształt nosa kadłuba, standardowy dla późniejszych wersji. Nowy nos był dłuższy, opływowy, uformowany z dużych sferycznych przezroczystych elementów, tłoczonych na gorąco ze szkła organicznego Perspex. Zamontowany był w nim jeden ruchomy karabin maszynowy, posiadający ograniczony sektor ostrzału. W zamian za osłabienie uzbrojenia strzeleckiego z przodu, wprowadzono nową, niższą wieżyczkę grzbietową z czterema karabinami maszynowymi, stawiającą mniejszy opór aerodynamiczny (wszystkie serie posiadały ponadto wieżyczkę ogonową z czterema karabinami maszynowymi). W celu poprawienia stateczności, powiększono podwójne stateczniki pionowe i zmieniono ich kształt z trójkątnych na trapezowe (ta modyfikacja, podobnie jak modyfikacja nosa kadłuba, była też wprowadzana w niektórych starszych samolotach podczas remontów). Zmiana stateczników znacząco poprawiła wychodzenie bombowca z korkociągu, z powodu którego utracono do tej pory wiele maszyn. Zastosowano też nową wersję silników Merlin 22 (1390 KM). Seria IA była produkowana od marca 1943. Zbudowano łącznie 1966 samolotów wersji Mk.II (1948 według innych danych, z tego 894 serii IA).

Od końca 1942 produkowano także odmiany patrolowe morskie GR Mk.II Series I (Special) i GR Mk.II Series IA, używane w lotnictwie obrony wybrzeża RAF Coastal Command. Część samolotów wersji Mk.II przebudowywano na specjalne wersje transportowo-desantowe, oznaczone A, o powiększonym zasięgu i zredukowanym uzbrojeniu.

Samoloty wersji Mk.V (HP.63) były modyfikacją wersji Mk.II, z zastosowaniem systemów hydraulicznych i podwozia systemu Dowty (stosowanego w Lancasterach) zamiast Messier. Zbudowano ich 915 sztuk, od sierpnia 1942, w wersjach Mk.V Series I (Special) i Series IA, odpowiadających równolegle produkowanym seriom Mk.II. Z uwagi na zawodne podwozie, samoloty tej wersji przeważnie nie były używane jako bombowce, natomiast były licznie używane w wersji patrolowej morskiej GR Mk.V, transportowo-desantowej A Mk.V (do holowania szybowców desantowych) i wersji zwiadu meteorologicznego Met Mk.V.

Najliczniejszą wersją Halifaksa była bombowa B Mk.III, produkowana od lipca 1943 (oznaczenie fabryczne HP.61). Oprócz dotychczasowych modyfikacji, wprowadziła ona jako napęd silniki gwiazdowe typu Bristol Hercules XVI o mocy 1650 KM, co było istotną zmianą ze względu na usunięcie istotnej wady poprzednich wersji bombowca, w których gazy wylotowe silników sprawiały, że samolot był widoczny w ciemnościach i łatwo zestrzeliwany przez nocne myśliwce wroga. Późniejsze samoloty tej wersji miały zaokrąglone końcówki skrzydeł, co nieco zwiększyło rozpiętość. Zbudowano 2091 sztuk tej wersji (2132 według innych danych), z tego niewielką liczbę wersji desantowej A Mk.III. Późniejsze wersje Halifaksów napędzane były również silnikami gwiazdowymi. Wersja Mk.IV nie była produkowana.

Ostatnie wersje bombowe, budowane w mniejszej liczbie pod koniec wojny, bazowały na Mk.III, zachowując oznaczenie fabryczne HP.61. Były to Mk.VI z silnikami Hercules 100 o mocy 1800 KM, budowana od października 1944 i Mk.VII ze słabszymi silnikami Hercules XVI. Zbudowano 457 Mk.VI i 408 Mk.VII, z tego 234 w wersji transportowo-desantowej A Mk.VII.

Już po wojnie powstała nieuzbrojona wersja transportowa Halifax C Mk.VIII (HP.70), z powiększonym przedziałem transportowym w miejscu komory bombowej i miejscem dla 11 pasażerów. Zbudowano jej 100 sztuk, począwszy od czerwca 1945. Część później przebudowano na cywilną wersję transportowo-pasażerską Handley Page Halton, zabierającą 10 pasażerów. Ostatnią wersją wojskową była powojenna transportowo-desantowa A Mk.IX (HP.71), służąca do transportu 16 spadochroniarzy, uzbrojona w karabin maszynowy w standardowym przeszklonym nosie i wieżyczkę ogonową – zbudowano jej 145 sztuk.

Łącznie zbudowano 6176 seryjnych Halifaksów [4] , do zakończenia produkcji w listopadzie 1946. Oprócz macierzystych zakładów Handley Page, produkowały je firmy English Electric, Fairey Aviation, Rootes Motors i London Aircraft Production Group.

Samoloty Halifax weszły na uzbrojenie brytyjskiego lotnictwa bombowego począwszy od listopada 1940 roku – jako pierwszy otrzymał je nowo sformowany 35 Dywizjon RAF, który osiągnął gotowość w lutym 1941 r. [5] Pierwszy lot bojowy Halifaksy wykonały w składzie tego dywizjonu w nocy 10/11 marca 1941 r. podczas nalotu na port Hawr, a w nocy 12/13 marca zadebiutowały w nalotach na Niemcy (stocznię B&V w Hamburgu) [6] . Do końca 1941 roku otrzymały je ogółem cztery dywizjony 4 Grupy Bombowej (nry 35, 76, 10, 102), które zrzuciły w tym roku 1399 ton bomb [6] . Zgodnie z brytyjską doktryną, Halifaksy działały na ogół jako bombowce nocne, operując z baz w Wielkiej Brytanii. W związku z przyjęciem przez dowództwo lotnictwa bombowego Bomber Command w lutym 1942 roku strategii zmasowanej ofensywy bombowej przeciw niemieckim miastom, Halifaksy w rosnących liczbach były używane masowo w kolejnych nocnych nalotach RAF na niemieckie miasta i zakłady przemysłowe aż do końca wojny, liczebnością ustępując jedynie wprowadzonym w 1942 roku samolotom Avro Lancaster [7] . W połowie 1942 roku latało na nich już 7 dywizjonów 4 Grupy (w tym jeden kanadyjski nr 405) [7] . 130 Halifaksów wzięło udział w pierwszym wielkim nalocie tysiąca samolotów na Kolonię 30/31 maja 1942 roku, a następnie brały udział w kolejnych masowych nalotach na Essen 1/2 czerwca i Bremę 25/26 czerwca (straty wyniosły odpowiednio 4, 8 i 9 samolotów) [8] . W tym roku Halifaksy zrzuciły 8147 ton bomb (mniej od Wellingtonów i Lancasterów i niewiele mniej od Stirlingów) [6] . Od sierpnia 1942 roku dywizjon 35 przeszedł do 8 Grupy Bombowej, grupującej samoloty oznaczania celów (pathfinder), będąc jej jedynym dywizjonem latającym na halifaksach, do marca 1944 roku, kiedy został przezbrojony w Lancastery (od 30 stycznia 1943 roku używał operacyjnie samolotów wyposażonych w radar H2S) [7] . Od października 1942 roku Halifaksy zaczęły otrzymywać także dywizjony kanadyjskiej 6 Grupy Bombowej (początkowo w marcu 1943 r. latały na nich trzy) [7] . Oprócz celów w Niemczech, w marcu i kwietniu 1942 r. Halifaksy, operując ze Szkocji, brały udział w nieskutecznych nalotach na pancernik „Tirpitz” w norweskich fiordach (pierwszy nalot 30/31 stycznia nie osiągnął celu z powodu pogody) [7] .

W 1943 roku Halifaksy zrzuciły już 37 500 ton bomb mniej jedynie od Lancasterów, które stały się podstawowymi bombowcami brytyjskimi [6] . W masowych nalotach na Niemcy, m.in. na Hamburg (Operacja Gomora), udział brało średnio po 200–250 samolotów tego typu [7] . 218 Halifaksów uczestniczyło w nalocie na ośrodek badań rakietowych w Peenemünde 17/18 sierpnia 1943 r. [9] Pod koniec 1943 roku Halifaksy Mk.II i V ponosiły większe straty od Lancasterów, dysponując gorszymi osiągami, m.in. w nalocie na Berlin 20/21 stycznia 1944 roku stracono ich 22 z 264 [9] . Nowa wersja Mk.III wprowadzana od początku 1944 roku miała jednak już podobne osiągi do konkurenta. Początkowo jednak nadal Halifaksom przydzielano niższe wysokości dolotu, co wiązało się z większym ryzykiem strat później sytuacja uległa poprawie [9] . Jedną z największych jednostkowych strat przyniósł nalot na Norymbergę 30/31 marca 1944 roku, kiedy zestrzelono 31 z 214 Halifaksów (14,5%, wobec również dość wysokich strat 11,2% Lancasterów) [10] . W lutym 1944 roku sprzymierzone lotnictwo miało 21 dywizjonów bombowych wyposażonych w Halifaksy (10 w 4. i 11 w 6. Grupie), a ponadto cztery dywizjony Bomber Command specjalnego przeznaczenia (35 Dywizjon wskazywania celów, 192 Dywizjon walki radioelektronicznej, 138 i 161 Dywizjony operacji specjalnych) [9] . W maju 1944 roku do 4. Grupy doszły jeszcze dwa francuskie dywizjony RAF (346 i 347), co doprowadziło do największej liczby dywizjonów Bomber Command wyposażonych w Halifaxy – 26 (23 bombowych i 3 specjalnych) [10] . W lipcu 1944 roku Bomber Command dysponowało największą liczbą 562 Halifaksów (bez lotnictwa transportowego i obrony wybrzeża) [5] . Od kwietnia do sierpnia 1944 roku, w związku z lądowaniem w Normandii, ciężkie bombowce używane były do nalotów na cele we Francji, na korzyść wojsk inwazyjnych oraz przeciw wyrzutniom V-1. W nocnych nalotach na baterie nadbrzeżne i węzły komunikacyjne w Normandii 5/6 i 6/7 czerwca 1944 r. uczestniczyło odpowiednio aż 412 i 418 Halifaksów [10] . Z uwagi na odzyskanie przewagi w powietrzu, część nalotów od tej pory miała miejsce w dzień [10] . Między innymi, 30 czerwca ciężkie bombowce, w tym 105 Halifaksów, bombardowały w dzień pozycje niemieckiej 2. i 9. Dywizji Pancernej pod Villers-Bocage [10] . W sierpniu 1944 roku wznowiono strategiczną ofensywę bombową przeciw Niemcom od 27 sierpnia także w dzień [11] . Od września 1944 r. bombardowano m.in. zakłady produkcji benzyny syntetycznej i Zagłębie Ruhry, atakowano też nadal cele na bliskim zapleczu frontu na korzyść wojsk lądowych [11] . W największych nalotach brało udział od 300 do ponad 450 Halifaksów, w tym w nalocie na Duisburg 14/15 października 1944 r. – 468 [12] . Nietypowo użyto samolotów 4. Grupy od 25 września 1944 roku, transportując w ciągu 8 dni 1 475 000 litrów benzyny dla lotnictwa taktycznego w Belgii [11] . Halifaxy zrzuciły ogółem w 1944 roku 163 600 ton bomb [6] . Ostatnie loty bojowe miały miejsce 25 kwietnia 1945 (dzienny nalot na Wangerooge na Wyspach Fryzyjskich, w którym brało udział 308 Halifaxów) [12] i 3 maja 1945, na Flensburg. W 1945 roku zrzuciły one 40 420 ton bomb [6] .

Jako jedyne z czterosilnikowych bombowców brytyjskich, Halifaksy zostały użyte na Bliskim Wschodzie, operując w składzie elementów 10 i 76 Dywizjonu z Palestyny i Egiptu od czerwca 1942 roku przeciw wojskom niemieckim w Afryce Północnej, w tym Tobruku [8] . We wrześniu 1942 r. utworzono z tych samolotów australijski 462 Dywizjon RAAF, który następnie od lutego 1943 roku operował z Tunezji przeciw celom we Włoszech, a od października 1943 r. z Libii przeciw celom w Grecji, na Krecie i Rodos [8] .

Samoloty Halifax odbyły w czasie II wojny światowej 82 773 operacji bojowych, zrzucając 251 066 ton bomb – prawie 1/4 ogólnego tonażu zrzuconego przez Bomber Command (23,5%), co dało im drugie miejsce po liczniej stosowanych do bombardowania i lepiej się do tego nadających samolotach Avro Lancaster [13] . „Rekordzistą” był Halifaks nr LV 907 o nazwie własnej „Friday 13th” ze 158 Dywizjonu, który odbył 128 misji bojowych. Średni ładunek bomb zrzucony z Halifaksa w przeliczeniu na samoloty biorące udział w misjach, wynosił 3100 kg [5] . Straty w jednostkach bombowych wyniosły 1884 samoloty (2,28% stanu) i były jedynie nieznacznie większe procentowo od Lancasterów (2,20%) [12] . Ogółem podczas wojny samolotów tych używało 35 dywizjonów Bomber Command, a do końca wojny dotrwało wyposażone w nie 19 dywizjonów [5] .

Halifax znalazł względnie szerokie zastosowanie jako samolot do operacji specjalnych, w 138 i 161 Dywizjonach RAF [9] . Samoloty tego typu w samotnych nocnych dalekodystansowych lotach dostarczały na spadochronach ludzi i wyposażenie ruchom oporu i oddziałom partyzanckim w okupowanych przez Niemców krajach Europy, w tym w Polsce. Loty do Polski z baz brytyjskich były najdłuższe, trwające 14 godzin i mogły być wykonywane jedynie w sezonie jesienno-zimowym z uwagi na długie noce. Jedynie na mniejszych odległościach Halifaksy wspomagały samoloty Armstrong Whitworth Whitley i Westland Lysander. Dopiero od 1943 były one zastępowane przez amerykańskie B-24 Liberator o większym zasięgu, lecz nie zostały przez nie do końca wyparte.

Już we wrześniu 1941 jedna polska załoga została włączona w skład brytyjskiego 138 Dywizjonu Specjalnego Przeznaczenia (Special Duty Squadron), wykonującego loty z zaopatrzeniem dla Armii Krajowej. Pilotami byli: Tadeusz Jasiński i Franciszek Sobkowiak, zaś dowódcą mjr nawigator Stanisław Król. Podczas pierwszego lotu do Polski 7/8 listopada 1941, na skutek wyczerpania paliwa, samolot lądował awaryjnie w Szwecji. Następnie kolejne przeszkalane polskie załogi wykonywały loty w składzie dywizjonu specjalnego na halifaksach. Pierwsza utracona polska załoga rozbiła się w fatalnych warunkach pogodowych o szczyt góry w Austrii 21 kwietnia 1942.

Po rozwiązaniu na skutek strat w kwietniu 1943 polskiego 301 Dywizjonu Bombowego, część jego załóg przydzielono do brytyjskiego 138 Dywizjonu Specjalnego Przeznaczenia jako jego eskadrę. Pod koniec 1943 przemianowano ją na 301 Polską Eskadrę Specjalnego Przeznaczenia (301 Polish Special Duty Flight), a następnie na 1586 Eskadrę Specjalnego Przeznaczenia (1586 SDF). Na samolotach Halifax i Liberator polska eskadra, wraz z innymi jednostkami sojuszniczymi, zaopatrywała m.in. oddziały Armii Krajowej w Polsce, dostarczając przy tym przeszkolonych w zakresie dywersji cichociemnych. Samoloty te dokonywały również zrzutów podczas powstania warszawskiego. Loty te dokonywane były na wersji Mk.II, gdyż mocniejsze wersje Mk.III walczyły w ramach Bomber Command. W listopadzie eskadrę wzmocniono i przemianowano ponownie na 301 Dywizjon, a w marcu 1945 przeniesiono do lotnictwa transportowego. Po zakończeniu II wojny światowej, do grudnia 1946 Polacy wykonywali w składzie 301 dywizjonu loty transportowe na samolotach wersji C Mk.VIII.

Oprócz lotnictwa bombowego, Halifaksy były używane także w Dowództwie Obrony Wybrzeża (RAF Coastal Command), do patrolowania morskiego i obrony wybrzeża, z baz w Wielkiej Brytanii. Jako pierwszy był w tym charakterze używany kanadyjski 405 Dywizjon, latający na zwykłych bombowcach B Mk.II, oddelegowany z Bomber Command od 25 października 1942 r. do 1 marca 1943 r. [14] Poszukiwał on głównie okrętów podwodnych w Zatoce Biskajskiej. Następnie Halifaksy, już w wersjach patrolowych GR, były używane od grudnia 1942 r. przez dywizjon 58 Coastal Command i od lutego 1943 r. przez dywizjon 502, w obu przypadkach do końca wojny [14] . Dwa dalsze dywizjony Coastal Command (517 i 518) używały od listopada 1943 roku Halifaksów Met.V i Met.III do rozpoznania meteorologicznego nad Atlantykiem [14] . W wersjach transportowo-desantowych A, używane były do holowania szybowców desantowych podczas operacji powietrznodesantowych. Halifaksy były jedynymi samolotami, oprócz Short Stirling, które zostały przeznaczone do holowania ciężkich szybowców Hamilcar i głównymi używanymi do tego celu. Holowały też średnie szybowce Airspeed Horsa.

Na Halifaksach podczas wojny latały także dywizjony bombowe lotnictwa kanadyjskiego (RCAF), australijskiego (RAAF), nowozelandzkiego (RNZAF) i 2 dywizjony Wolnych Francuzów (numery 346 Guyenne i 347 Tunisie, od maja 1944 roku [10] ). Po wojnie Halifaksy pozostały przez krótki czas na wyposażeniu lotnictwa brytyjskiego, przede wszystkim w wersjach patrolowych i transportowych. Ostatnie loty Halifaksów w służbie brytyjskiej miały miejsce w 1952 (GR Mk.VI).

Podczas testów w ośrodku RAF Boscombe Down stwierdzono, że samolot miał dobre charakterystyki pilotażowe [4] . Również zachowanie po przeciągnięciu było bardzo dobre, zwłaszcza jak na tak duży samolot [4] . Samolot w normalnych warunkach wykazywał lepszą stateczność kierunkową, niż Avro Manchester, i miał wygodniejszy dostęp do kabiny [4] . Zasięg wynosił 2993 km z ładunkiem bomb 2667 kg, a przy ładunku 5156 kg spadał do 1416 km [4] . Maksymalna prędkość nurkowania została określona na 523 km/h [4] .

Jednakże samoloty pierwszych serii (łącznie z wersją Mk.II) słabo działały na stery przy małych prędkościach (poniżej 193 km/h), a w razie asymetrii ciągu (np. uszkodzenie silnika w walce) mogły wejść w skrętny ślizg boczny (rodzaj płaskiego korkociągu) [15] . Cechę tę wykrył i opisał polski pilot doświadczalny inż. Stanisław Riess, który zginął podczas kolejnego lotu próbnego na wersji Mk.II tej maszyny 4 lutego 1943 roku. Problem został rozwiązany w wersji Mk.V poprzez powiększenie stateczników pionowych.

Te wcześniejsze wersje maszyn HP Halifax cechowały się również jedynie dostateczną sterownością i znacznie ustępowały tu maszynie Avro Lancaster. Podczas startów w gorącym klimacie (np. baza Campo Casale w Brindisi – Włochy) miały wyraźny niedobór mocy podczas startu i wznoszenia. Miały tendencję do schodzenia w lewo z osi pasa podczas startu, wymagały więcej akcji ze strony pilotów niż inne maszyny. Były bardzo wrażliwe na boczny wiatr podczas lądowania. Brak jednej, dużej komory bombowej (jak w Lancasterze) sprawiał, iż HP Halifax nie mógł zabierać na pokład bomb najcięższego wagomiaru.

Był to czterosilnikowy średniopłat o konstrukcji całkowicie metalowej. W wersji Mk.I i Mk.II serii I, z przodu kadłuba w dolnej części znajdowało się oszklone stanowisko bombardiera, nad nim wieżyczka strzelecka z dwoma karabinami maszynowymi. Wersje począwszy od Mk.II serii IA miały przeszklony opływowy nos kadłuba ze stanowiskiem bombardiera w dolnej części i jednym ruchomym karabinem maszynowym.

Za częścią nosową kadłuba znajdowała się przeszklona kabina pilotów, której dach przechodził w grzbiet kadłuba, poprowadzony na tej samej wysokości. Na grzbiecie, w środkowej części samolotu umieszczona była wieżyczka strzelecka (z wyjątkiem wersji Mk.I, wersji transportowych i specjalnych). W dolnej części kadłuba znajdowała się zamykana komora bombowa. Na końcu kadłuba znajdowała się wieżyczka strzelecka z czterema karabinami maszynowymi (z wyjątkiem wersji C Mk.VIII). Samolot miał usterzenie podwójne, stateczniki i stery miały obrys zbliżony do trójkątnego (wczesne wersje) lub trapezowego (instalowanym także na wczesnych wersjach podczas remontów). Samolot miał podwozie klasyczne, główne golenie z pojedynczymi kołami wciągane były do gondoli wewnętrznych silników, kółko ogonowe było stałe lub częściowo wciągane w późnych wersjach.

Załoga składała się zazwyczaj z siedmiu osób (dwóch pilotów, mechanik pokładowy, nawigator-bombardier, radiotelegrafista, górny strzelec i ogonowy strzelec). Część późniejszych samolotów wersji bombowych posiadała radar H2S do obserwacji powierzchni ziemi w celu ułatwienia celowania (Halifax był pierwszym samolotem, na którym zamontowano ten radar w marcu 1942). Wersje transportowe specjalnego przeznaczenia miały dodatkowe zbiorniki paliwa w komorze bombowej.

Uzbrojenie Edytuj

Główne uzbrojenie ofensywne stanowiły bomby przenoszone w komorze bombowej w kadłubie o długości 6,70 m i sześciu komorach w przykadłubowych częściach skrzydeł dla bomb o masie do 227 kg [16] . Udźwig maksymalny wynosił 4990 kg (11 000 lb) bomb we wczesnych wersjach, zwiększony do 6577 kg (14 500 lb) w późnych [16] . Typowe warianty zabieranych bomb to 15 × 113 kg (250 lb) lub 227 kg (500 lb), a maksymalny to 4 × 907 kg (2000 lb) w kadłubie i 6 × 227 kg w skrzydłach [16] . Późniejsze wersje otrzymały zmodyfikowaną komorę bombową i mogły przenosić w niej również dwie bomby 1814 kg (4000 lb) lub jedną 3629 kg (8000 lb – w tym wariancie drzwi komory nie były domknięte). Można było również przenosić dwie miny morskie o masie 680 kg [16] .

Uzbrojenie obronne stanowiły karabiny maszynowe kaliber 7,7 mm: Browning w wieżach strzeleckich i Vickers K pojedyncze.

  • Mk.I: 2 karabiny maszynowe w wieżyczce nosowej Boulton Paul C, 4 karabiny maszynowe w wieżyczce ogonowej Boulton Paul E, 4 karabiny maszynowe Vickers K w bocznych oknach tylnej części kadłuba (po dwa) [17]
  • Mk.II Series I: 2 karabiny maszynowe w wieżyczce nosowej, 2 karabiny maszynowe w wieżyczce grzbietowej, 4 karabiny maszynowe w wieżyczce ogonowej
  • Mk.II Series I (Special): 4 karabiny maszynowe w wieżyczce ogonowej
  • Mk.II Series IA: 1 karabin maszynowy Vickers ruchomy w nosie kadłuba, 4 karabiny maszynowe w wieżyczce grzbietowej, 4 karabiny maszynowe w wieżyczce ogonowej (także Mk.III, V, VI i VII)
  • Mk.IX: 1 karabin maszynowy Vickers ruchomy w nosie kadłuba, 2 wkm Browning 12,7 mm w wieżyczce ogonowej

Napęd Edytuj

Napęd stanowiły cztery silniki rzędowe Rolls-Royce Merlin kilku odmian lub gwiazdowe Bristol Hercules. Samolot miał zbiorniki paliwa w skrzydłach o pojemności zwiększanej w kolejnych wersjach (Mk.I Srs.I: 6328 l, Mk.I Srs.3: 7437 l, Mk.II: 8556 l, Mk.III: 9028 l, Mk.VI: 9956 l). Samoloty mogły przenosić dodatkowe zbiorniki w komorze bombowej, zamiast części ładunku bomb.

Śmigła trzypłatowe Rotol o średnicy 3,8 m, metalowe, o regulowanym skoku łopat [3] .


Conception

Cet avion fut conçu en 1936 à la demande de la Royal Air Force qui désirait posséder un bombardier bimoteur motorisé par Rolls-Royce. Les premières études de la motorisation amenèrent toutefois les concepteurs à faire du Halifax un appareil quadrimoteur dès 1937.

Le premier vol eut lieu en 1939 et le Halifax entra en service actif en 1941, et effectua sa première mission de guerre le 10 mars 1941 [ 1 ] .

Rapidement, des versions incorporèrent des tourelles de défense disposées sur le dessus de la queue, sous le ventre et dans le nez de l'appareil. Le Halifax emportait 7 hommes d'équipage, entre 8 000 et 13 100 litres de carburant et environ 4 tonnes de bombes, pour un poids maximum de 30,5 tonnes au décollage. Les missions de guerre duraient en moyenne entre 6 et 8 heures. La vitesse était de 460 à 470 km/h au sol et son plafond pouvait atteindre un peu plus de 20 000 pieds.

Bien qu'inférieur en performances au Lancaster plus récent, le Halifax était en revanche plus polyvalent et se vit souvent utilisé dans des rôles autres que le bombardement : reconnaissance maritime, traction de planeurs, transport de troupes aéroportées ou de matériels.

Plus de 6 000 Halifax furent construits avant que la production ne cesse en 1946.

Les groupes français de la RAF "Guyenne" (squadron 346) et "Tunisie" (squadron 347), basés à Elvington, utilisaient des Halifax V puis III et VI. Ils étaient affectés à des missions de nuit, principalement sur la Ruhr.


Handley Page Halifax Forum

Dwight, if you click on the name 'richard rose' in the left margin of post above yours you should get an e-mail address so you can mail him directly with your request. This is quite an old thread on the forum so he may not be checking in regularly.

Aug 29, 2007 #16 2007-08-29T04:27

Thanks for the suggestion Linzee, I will do that.

This seems to be a very experienced and technical group, so I have some further questions.
Is there any way of finding out which engines were installed on MA-W, LL183, and where they were manufactured?

I understand the types used at that time were Bristol Hercules, Rolls-Royce built Merlins, and Packard Merlins. What were the differences in power between the engines? On paper? In practice?

MA-W crashed because it was unable to maintain altitude after two of its engines failed. Would a different type have possibly kept it in the air?

Aug 29, 2007 #17 2007-08-29T08:15

The type of engines and manufacturer will be noted on the a/c loss card A.M. Form 78 (although the info may possibly be available elsewhere of course). The A.M. 78 loss cards are held in the records at 'DORIS' in the RAF Museum at Hendon, see this link for further information about how to visit the records http://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/london/research/index.cfm

I'll leave those who know more about the technical side of engines to give a response on your other questions.

Hope that helps,
Regards
Linzee

Aug 29, 2007 #18 2007-08-29T08:40

Thanks for the suggestion Linzee, I will do that.

This seems to be a very experienced and technical group, so I have some further questions.
Is there any way of finding out which engines were installed on MA-W, LL183, and where they were manufactured?

I understand the types used at that time were Bristol Hercules, Rolls-Royce built Merlins, and Packard Merlins. What were the differences in power between the engines? On paper? In practice?

MA-W crashed because it was unable to maintain altitude after two of its engines failed. Would a different type have possibly kept it in the air?

As a Halifax V, the aircraft will most likely have been fitted with the RR Merlin XX engine. You can confirm this by getting a copy of the Form 78 Aircraft Movement Card (try the RAF Museum - they may even tell you over the phone).
The Mk V was basically a Mk II with a different undercarriage.

Hercules engines were used on the Mk III/VI/VII/VIII/IX.

A Halifax would fly one two engines, in fact it would fly on one but the latter was not recommended, it being safer to bale out! However, the degree of damage sustained (not necessarily confined to the engines)would determine how long it would stay in the air.
It is not possible to compare performance between aircraft with any meaningful results. It is known that considerable variation occurred between individual aircraft even from the same production run (your aircraft was built by Rootes).
I'm sure Karl will be able to advise on flight characteristics for better than I'll ever hope to.

You could always try the Rolls Royce Heritage Trust for specifics

I hope this is a little help

Aug 29, 2007 #19 2007-08-29T14:39

LL183 was outfitted with Rolls Royce Merlin 22 engines which produced 1480 hp.

Regardless of power plant any multi-engined aircraft is in trouble when it loses any of its engines. Big trouble if the loss is multiple engines.

The loss of even a single engine is problematic especially if the prop cannot be feathered because of the drag.

The loss of two is almost certain to result in a major struggle to maintain any reasonable altitude and the loss of two on one side or any unequal combination of engines will make the aircraft's handling extremely difficult if not near impossible. Of course different engines powered different other aircraft systems (hydraulics, electrics, etc.)

Although some aircraft were known to be able to make base remaining airborne with just a single power plant there would be a dramatic and steady rate of descent and of course the engine at full power would not last long.

In these circumstance almost any pilot or aircraft Captain would opt to give the order to abandon the aircraft if the conditions allowed. In any event a ditching, forced or crash landing would likely be imminent.

When I ran your scenario by a former Halifax Skipper he recollected that he landed on three once due to a glycol leak and that was exciting enough even though they had no other major problem. A two-engine failure with the likelihood of other damage to the aircraft and you'd best be on good terms with your maker.

Hope that perspective helps, Dwight.

Aug 30, 2007 #20 2007-08-30T21:38

Thank you all for your replies. You are a nice bunch!

I have sent an email off to 'DORIS' asking them to check the Form 78, and I expect that I'll receive a reply in the fullness of time 20 working days is their estimate.

I understand your point that having only two out of four engines is extremely hazardous regardless of how powerful they are. I hadn't thought of the possible effect on hydraulics and electrics, I guess there were no APU's in those days.

My uncle, Ted Jones, the flight engineer, said more than once that he thought that they could have stayed up if they'd had "proper" RR engines. I don't know what he meant by that, hence my questions. They were 500 miles from base but only 90 miles from the Bay of Biscay where they hoped to ditch and be picked up by an Allied ship. But it sounds like they were doomed no matter what they did. I think he may have been suffering from something like "pilot's guilt" in that he couldn't save the aircraft and get the crew home. He was a conscientious man and probably felt, quite wrongly, that he'd failed in his duty to coax the utmost power out of the remaining engines.

It's also interesting that this crew were from squadron 138 and unfamiliar with MA-W which was a 161 squadron machine. It was borrowed from 161 because their usual 138 machine was under repair. Human nature leads me to suspect that MA-W was an average to below average performer because the squadron 161 pilots would have tended to collar the better machines for themselves, and any loaners would have been what was left over. Is this an accurate perception?


Watch the video: Friday the 13th - Halifax Heavy Bomber HP Halifax 12 (May 2022).